Salvage code updated to help keep dangerous vehicles off the road

The updated insurance industry code of practice for dealing with motor salvage is being published today, ten years after it was last reviewed.

The Association of British Insurers (ABI), which co-ordinates the code, is sharing the results of an extensive review ahead of the new code coming into effect on 1st October 2017. It follows two years of engagement with multiple stakeholders including insurers, vehicle manufacturers, affected government departments and agencies, police and the vehicle leasing and salvage industries. The new code reflects the increasing complexity of newer vehicles which can make it harder for damaged cars to be safely repaired. It also has a greater focus on the condition of the vehicle rather than repair costs. Changes include:

  •  Replacing previous salvage categories A, B, C and D with
    • A: Scrap
    • B: Break
    • S: Structurally damaged repairable
    • N: Non-structurally damaged repairable
  • The scope of the code has been increased to include some guidance on motorcycles and quadricycles
  • Minimum qualification requirements have been introduced for all individuals who categorise vehicle salvage.

Ben Howarth, Senior Policy Adviser for Motor and Liability at the ABI, says:

“The salvage code is a great example of the insurance industry working together for the good of the general public. It’s important the code moves with the times, and this update takes account of two years of consultation and extensive technical  scrutiny from Thatcham Research. The changes are focused on making the UK’s roads safer, and ensuring that consumers have transparency about the history of vehicles they are considering buying.”

Tamzen Isacsson, SMMT Director of Communications and International, says:

“Manufacturers design and build vehicles to the highest possible safety standards. Today’s announcement is a positive and significant step by industry, insurers and governing bodies to further improve safety on our roads and ensure there is clarity on whether an accident-damaged vehicle is fit for repair or should be scrapped.

“We welcome the new voluntary code, but putting a complete stop to the unscrupulous activity of repairing vehicles that should be scrapped will require legislation.”

The new Code of Practice for the Categorisation of Motor Vehicle Salvage can be seen in full here.

Scotland to ‘phase out’ new petrol and diesel cars by 2032

Nicola Sturgeon outlines plans to ‘massively expand’ pilot projects to encourage uptake of electric vehicles.

The Scottish government has pledged to phase out new petrol and diesel cars and vans across Scotland by 2032, eight years ahead of the UK Government target. Nicola Sturgeon outlined plans to “massively expand” charging points and set up pilot projects to encourage uptake of electric vehicles.

The SNP leader also said there were plans to make the A9 Scotland’s first fully electric-enabled road and that an innovation fund would be set up to encourage climate-change solutions such as charging vehicles in areas with a high concentration of tenements.

The Government said the commitment was necessary due to the avoidable impact poor air quality was having on people’s health.

Jesse Norman, the parliamentary under-secretary at the Department for Transport, confirmed the Government’s plans.

“The Government has a manifesto commitment for almost all cars and vans on our roads to be zero emission by 2050. We believe this would necessitate all new cars and van being zero emission vehicles by 2040,” Mr Norman said in a written answer to the Commons.

It comes after Sadiq Khan, the London Mayor, pledged that London’s entire transport system would become zero emission by 2050, with a “zero emission zone” by 2025.

All taxis and minicabs in the capital will be non-polluting by 2033 while the entire bus fleet will be zero emission by 2037, the mayor’s office said.